The Fine Print, In Print

Scroll through our past print issues below. Looking for the PDF version? Check out our Issuu page here.

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  • Vol. IX Issue IV

    The Summer 2017 issue of The Fine Print is out-and-about town! Can't get your hands on a copy? We've collected the stories from this issue for you below:

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    Civil Reitz

    by Anne Marie Tamburro

    The namesakes of some of UF’s most iconic buildings undermine the school’s stated commitment to diversity.

    A Seedy Operation

    by Vincent McDonald

    What would IFAS be without prison labor?

    Paradise Lost

    by Sirene Dagher

    Two women are trying to revive Paradise Park, the segregated portion of Silver Springs.

    Read Up, Chow Down: Piper Gi’s

    by Ali Sundook

    Piper Gi’s brings a delectable, freshly made Philly to Gainesville. Plus: their recipe for a roasted red pepper pasta salad with toasted almonds and shredded parmesan.

    Seeing Stars: Summer 2017

    by Helen Stadelmaier

    What does your summer horoscope have in store?

    Art & Literature: Summer 2017

    by The Fine Print staff

    Art by Rachel Hyvonen. Story by Helen Stadelmaier.

    Taking Down the Boys

    by Molly Minta

    The only two women on UF’s wrestling team are taking down barriers.

    Homestead Instead: Tapestries

    by Klarizza Aggabao

    Why buy it when you can make it? This time around: Tapestries. They’re i-loom-inating.

    Simply Science: Certified Fresh

    by Liana Zafran

    Ever wondered how organic regulations were created?

    For the Record: Summer 2017

    by The Fine Print staff

    The scoop on some locally grown tunes. This issue, we talk to Sunmoonstar, Goode Bye and Edmondson.

  • Vol. IX, Issue III

    The latest issue of The Fine Print is out and about town. Can’t get your hands on a copy? Below are the articles from the Spring 2017 issue for your reading pleasure.

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    Homestead Instead: I Been Stankin’

    by Emily Miller

    Wake up and smell the roses: We all stink.When your pits or breath are making your eyes water, it’s easy to turn to commercial products to tame them. But there are many natural ways to smell nice and rosy without harmful chemicals getting in the way. Being self-sufficient — especially in odorous areas — can …

    Simply Science: Troubled Waters

    by Brandon Corder

    We are increasingly dumping waste into our water. And it’s made a difference.  Water. We cook with it. We swim and play in it. We grow our food with it and travel on it. We like to look at it and, ultimately, drink it.  And 10 percent of Alachua County is covered in it, a …

    Monthly Manifesto: Restoration of Civil Rights Project

    by Assistant to the Founder Taissa Morimoto

    The Restoration of Civil Rights Project helps restore civil rights taken away when a person is convicted of a felony.

    Opinion: The Right to Bear Arms

    by Sidonie WolfsKeil

    Why is it easier to get a gun than it is to get an abortion?    A man wants to buy a gun. After traveling hundreds of miles, he pulls up to the gun store to see crowds of protestors picketing outside. The signs they hold read “murderer.” He weaves through the aggressive protesters, his …

    Darkest Before the Dawn

    by Molly Minta

    A night on duty with an Alachua County Crisis Center volunteer.

    Watch Your Waste

    by Shayna Tanen and Adriana Barbat

    Gainesville’s mandatory recycling ordinance is loosely enforced.

    Read Up, Chow Down: Dragonfly Sushi

    by Shayna Tanen

    In his 2001 review of the 1954 film “Seven Samurai,” Roger Ebert wrote that director Akira Kurosawa’s primary purpose was “to make a samurai movie that was anchored in ancient Japanese culture and yet argued for a flexible humanism in place of rigid traditions.” That description embodies the purpose of Dragonfly, Gainesville’s upscale sushi restaurant …

    Together We Stand

    by Kyle Giest

    A group of local activists face off against Plum Creek, a national corporation.

    Paper Cuts: Spring 2016

    by The Editors

    Not-necessarily-Gainesville-based news: Chicago black youth kicked Anita Alvarez out of office, and Poland is in a state of crisis.

  • Vol. IX, Issue I

    The Fall 2016 issue of The Fine Print is out and about town. Can’t get your hands on a copy? Flip through the online version here.

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    Meat in the Middle

    by Sirene Dagher

    Jose Caraballo tried tempeh, the vegetarian soy product infiltrating menus all throughout town, for the first time at “The Farm,” a spiritual camp founded in Tennessee in the 1970s.

    Homestad Instead: Quit Bugging Me!

    by Sophia Semensky

    This time, we show you how to naturally fend off mosquitoes and other creepy-crawlies.

    Read Up, Chow Down: Public & General

    by Martha Paz-Soldan

    Public & General dresses up your neighborhood pub.

    Monthly Manifesto: Southwest Advocacy Group (SWAG)

    by Co-chair Dorothy Thomas

    SWAG aims to improve quality of life in Southwest Gainesville.

  • Vol. VII, Issue IV

    The Summer 2015 issue of The Fine Print is out and about town. Can’t get your hands on a copy? Flip through the online version here.

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    A Person’s a Person

    by Abby Doupnik

    It’s important to treat the homeless with dignity and respect.

    Read Up, Chow Down: Civilization

    by Sarah Senfeld

    Civilization’s nutty and sweet vegan sourdough French toast is a Sunday brunch crowd pleaser that’ll end your weekend in style.

    Monthly Manifesto: Gainesville Opportunity House

    by Gainesville Opportunity Center

    Gainesville Opportunity Center helps provide opportunities for those with mental illness to lead fulfilling, independent lives.

    Simply Science: Nutrition: Impossible

    by Annie Bradshaw

    Local programs have been working to eliminate food deserts throughout the city, or areas that force low-income residents to rely on unhealthy food because nearby cheap, nutritious food is scarce.

    A Private Affair

    by Samantha Schuyler

    Members of Gainesville’s trans community object to a local art gallery featuring anonymous photos of women’s vulvas.

    Hit the Trails

    by Marisa Papenfuss

    Summer in Gainesville have you feeling restless? Have no fear, we’ve got a guide to local trails to keep your ramblin’ feet moving.

    Homestead Instead: One Man’s Trash

    by Shannon Nehiley

    Composting is cheap and environmentally friendly, and we’ve got the dirt on how to create your own personal compost bin.

    Paper Cuts: Summer 2015

    by Fine Print Staff

    This round, the women who started the Black Lives Matter hashtag and Starbucks tries to make social awareness a part of their brand.

    Leading Ladies

    by Ashley Yo

    A local Girl Scout troop uses their energy and passion to create social justice initiatives for the community. Recently, they sewed hundreds of cotton pads for school girls in South Sudan.

    Craft Works

    by Erica Sterling

    Two local women converted an abandoned warehouse into a community craft space with the tools and the place for artists to create.

  • Vol. VII, Issue III

    The Spring 2015 issue of The Fine Print is out and about town. Can’t get your hands on a copy? Flip through the online version here.

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    Spring Fever

    by Jasmine Haddaway

    A comprehensive guide to North Central Florida’s springs.

    Identity Crisis

    by Abby Doupnik

    A program that connects homeless to new technology.

    The Show Must Go On

    by Erick Edwing

    After 911 House, a staple in the Gainesville music scene, burned down, the community came together in support.

    Defying Convention

    by Zach Schlein

    SwampCon creates an empowering space for intersecting identities to the University of Florida.

    Heads Together

    by Vanessa Kinsey

    Mental illness, just like diabetes or epilepsy, is treatable. It is something that can be managed.

    Homestead Instead: No ‘Poo, No Problem

    by Zoe Green

    Why buy it when you can make it? Learn how to make your own shampoo and conditioner from the comfort of your home.

    Simply Science: Birds of a Feather

    by Annie Bradshaw

    Annie explains research conducted by a team at UF who helped unravel the bird genome.

    Read Up, Chow Down: Crane Ramen

    by Danny Duffy

    Crane Ramen’s umami-packed mushroom salad is bright, gingery and refreshing–just the right thing to hustle you from winter to spring.

    Monthly Manifesto: Gainesville Girls Rock Camp

    by Co-Director Chelsea Carnes

    Gainesville Girls Rock Camp uses music and performance as a platform to promote self-esteem, community and creative self-expression in young girls.

    For the Record: Spring 2015

    by Fine Print Staff

    Here’s the scoop on some locally grown tunes. This issue, we talk to Duke, GUTS and The Co-Pilots.

  • Vol. VII, Issue II

    The Winter 2014 issue of The Fine Print is now available online as a PDF. Flip through it here.

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    All of the Lights

    by Shayna Tanen

    The University of Florida’s stripped vegetation from parts of campus in the wake of early fall’s assaults, though experts have suggested other tactics.

    Standard Deviation

    by Zach Schlein

    An elementary school teacher civilly protests the state’s standardized testing practices by refusing to administer the FAIR test to her students.

    Playing Fair

    by Kyle Hayes

    Local protesters launched a series of demonstrations calling for Publix, the largest employee-owned company in America, to join the Fair Food Program.

    Chart the Course

    by Samantha Schuyler

    A local charter school founded by five women, set to launch in fall 2016, will encourage critical thinking, emotional intelligence and social activism.

    Into the Wild

    by Alec Carver

    A community farming system uses simple and natural means to create an edible, intentional ecosystem.

    Garage Bands

    by Kyle Hayes

    As venues throughout the city shut down, local bands are turning to storage units on the outskirts of town for practice space.

    Simply Science: I, Robot

    by Matias Kaplan

    Matias gives us the scoop on a UF team that’s blurring the line between human and technological intelligence.

    Homestead Instead: Mend Your Ways

    by Ashley Yo

    Why buy it when you can make it? Learn how to sew your own messenger bag with tips from Cori Cake of Cattail Outfitters.

    One Nation Under Gun

    by Jordan MacKenzie

    The first and most crucial disarmament that society must enact is one within the human spirit.

    For the Record: Winter 2014

    by Fine Print Staff

    Here’s the scoop on some locally grown tunes. This issue, we talk to Blue Herons, Strange Lords and Bear Puck.

  • Vol. VII, Issue I

    The Fall 2014 issue of The Fine Print is out and about town. Can’t get your hands on a copy? Flip through the online version here.

    Read the issue on Issuu

    Our Fair Lady

    by Zach Schlein

    Lady Pearl’s provocative drag shows brought the University Club acclaim, but it was her kindness and strength that became her legacy.

    Read Up, Chow Down: The Fat Tuscan

    by Fine Print Staff

    The Fat Tuscan’s arugula pesto is warm and refreshing, perfect for transitioning from summer to fall.

    Monthly Manifesto: Mill Creek Farm

    by Mill Creek Farm Staff

    The Retirement Home for Horses at Mill Creek Farm gives senior and abused horses a place to live out the rest of their lives in peace.

    Band of Sisters

    by Samantha Schuyler

    An activist collective developed in the wake of early fall’s series of sexual assaults to reclaim the conversation of rape culture on their terms.

    Welcome Home

    by Kyle Hayes

    The first cohousing community south of Atlanta will break ground in Gainesville early next year

    Just(ly) Married

    by Abby Doupnik

    We break down the legal process of what lies between the sunshine state and the freedom to marry.

    Simply Science: Biology’s E-Volution

    by Matias Kaplan

    Matias breaks down what happens when you cross biology and technology–a lot of very excited scientists.

    Beware #BeAware

    by Fine Print Staff

    UF Student Government’s Sexual Assault Awareness Week needs a tuneup; we talked to three campus groups who have ideas.

    Going for the Gold

    by Vanessa Kinsey

    Gainesville’s ready to become a gold-standard biking city, but funding and a united community are getting in the way.

    Homestead Instead: Kombucha

    by Nina Plocek

    Why buy it when you can make it? Learn how to make fizzy, probiotic kombucha on your journey to blissful self sufficiency.

  • Vol. VI, Issue IV

    The Summer 2014 issue of The Fine Print is out and about town. Can’t get your hands on a copy? Flip through the online version here.

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    Inoperative Cooperative

    by Erick Edwing

    The Citizen’s Co-op, founded on a philosophy of worker solidarity, struggles to find equity.

    Femme on the Frontline

    by Lily Wan

    Gainesville’s National Women’s Liberation’s upcoming annual workshop dissects the past to make change today.

    Don’t Be Stressin’ About the Session

    by Samantha Schuyler and Lily Wan

    Florida’s 2014 legislative session: It’s happening whether you understand it or not. Brush up on the process and this year’s bills with this handy guide!

    Simply Science: Dog Gone

    by John Arnst

    Simply Science columnist, John Arnst, delves into how Weil’s disease, a rare epidemic, is afflicting dogs in Gainesville.

    Going Off the Grid

    by Emma Roulette

    The grid system is more than just criss-crossed city blocks. Teach yourself these tricks and get to know Gainesville’s streets like the back of your hand!

    Read Up, Chow Down: Daily Green

    by Naida Sheikh

    Take a bite out of Daily Green’s egg salad. It’s a tasty treat for any summer outing.

    For the Record: Summer 2014

    by Fine Print Staff

    Here’s the scoop on some locally grown tunes. This issue, we talk to Jordan Burchel, Daniel Feinberg and The Savants of Soul.

    Monthly Manifesto: Alachua County Crisis Center

    by The Alachua County Crisis Center Executive Board

    The Alachua County Crisis Center provides free services for those going through personal crises, including counseling and a suicide-prevention hotline.

    Paper Cuts: Summer 2014

    by Fine Print Staff

    Not-necessarily-Gainesville-based news: The Internet is split over Amtrak’s writer residency, and people are more skeptical about climate change than ever.

    Lost in the Shuffle

    by Samantha Schuyler

    To make ends meet, migrant farm worker families regularly uproot their homes to move with the seasons–but at the expense of their children’s education.

  • Vol. VI, Issue III

    The Spring 2014 issue of The Fine Print is out and about town. Can’t get your hands on a copy? Flip through the online version here.

    Read the issue on Issuu

    Goodwill Hunting

    by Samantha Schuyler

    In exchange for taking care of Alachua County conservation lands, select members of the community are given the privilege of hunting on the lands.

    Get Your Fix

    by Ciera Battleson

    Free-to-use bike repair stations will be popping up across the city, allowing those with no other means of transportation a way to get their fix.

    Baby, Let’s Talk About Sexxx

    by Kyle Hayes

    UF’s first annual Sexxx Week brings a slew of speakers, including an adult film star, and a safe sex workshop hosted by X-Mart.

    Office Space: Patricia Hilliard-Nunn

    by Toni-Lee Maitland

    Beyond the blackboard with Patricia Hilliard-Nunn, author and UF African-American studies professor.

    For the Record: Spring 2014

    by Fine Print Staff

    We’ve got the scoop on your favorite local bands. This time, we listen to Hungry Hearts Club, Carpadium and Habits.

    Read Up, Chow Down

    by Kimberly Glass

    Cool off with the Lunchbox’s secret recipe for strawberry Szechuan peppercorn soda. It’s refreshing and incredibly easy to make!

    Monthly Manifesto: Jungle Friends Primate Sanctuary

    by Jungle Friends Primate Sanctuary

    Jungle Friends Primate Sanctuary gives a home to abused or unwanted New World primates.

    Paper Cuts Spring 2014

    by Fine Print Staff

    Not-necessarily-Gainesville-based news: conservatives are boycotting Girl Scout cookies; plus, a new app lets you get updates on drone attacks.

    From Dinner to Dirt

    by Kyle Hayes

    With 2015 and UF’s zero waste goal right around the corner, the school finally brings large-scale composting to campus.

    Simply Science: Nanowarriors

    by John Arnst

    In this installment of Simply Science, columnist John Arnst delves into the local drug company OneVax’s research and progress in diabetes prevention.

  • Vol. VI, Issue II

    The Winter 2013 issue of The Fine Print is out and about town. Can’t get your hands on a copy? Flip through the online version here.

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    Exile on Main Street

    by Samantha Schuyler

    The new Gainesville fire station will uproot the Church of Holy Colors and the Repurpose Project, making a dent in the South Main Street art community.

    Citrus Situation

    by Ashira Morris

    After citrus greening struck the University of Florida campus, over 100 trees were removed to slow the spread of the disease.

    The Coffee Buzz

    by Samantha Schuyler

    With Gainesville’s plethora of coffee shops, roasters and self-proclaimed connoisseurs, you wouldn’t want to be without knowledge of some coffee basics.

    Office Space: Mary Robison

    by Samantha Schuyler

    Author and UF creative writing professor Mary Robison had trouble with regular offices. So she uses a coffee shop instead.

    Read Up, Chow Down: Bistro 1245

    by Naida Sheikh

    We’ve got your favorite local restaurant’s secret recipes! Cozy up to your own homemade serving of Bistro 1245’s famous butternut squash soup. Plus, check out the freshest of the fresh locally available produce of the season.

    For The Record: Winter 2013

    by Fine Print Staff

    The latest from our music column on Gainesville bands. This issue, we tune in to Euglossine, The Slims and Cretin Girls.

    Breaking Down the Bars

    by Erick Edwing

    After nearly a decade of lawsuits and location changes, Gainesville’s center for the homeless will finally be up and running in its new home: a prison.

    Dive In

    by Lauren Adamson

    Dumpster diving: the hunt giving squandered food a second chance.

    Ziriums

    by Kyle Hayes

    Meet Nazir Hausawa: Performing as “Ziriums,” he followed his passion for progressive rap and hip-hop from Nigeria to New York City to Gainesville, Fl.

    Now, in a Time of Cholera

    by John Arnst

    The first piece from our new science column, Simply Science. For its debut, columnist John Arnst explores the recent resurgence of Cholera in the Caribbean.

  • Vol. VI, Issue I

    The Fall 2013 issue of The Fine Print is out and about town. Can’t get your hands on a copy? Flip through the PDF online here.

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    Got Debt?

    by Heather Reinblatt

    To fight mounting debt (no thanks to the flawed tuition and aid system), these students have gone to quite unconventional lengths to pay the bills.

    Rape Culture Not to Blame

    by Chelsea Hetelson

    Rape culture this, rape culture that. The term’s thrown around a lot, but rarely ever actually dissected. Let’s tackle it and see what’s really to blame.

    Let’s Get Physical

    by Derick Gomez

    Forget online shopping. Gainesville has book shops and video rental stores that are thriving in the digital age.

    Paper Cuts Fall 2013

    by Fine Print Staff

    National news that catches our eye: “bro” culture on the battlefront and the sweatshop-like conditions online shipping creates.

    Office Space: Dr. David Hackett

    by Griffin Horvath

    An up-and-close with Dr. David Hackett, American History professor at the University of Florida.

    Read Up, Chow Down: Flaco’s

    by Naida Sheikh

    We’ve got your favorite local restaurant’s secret recipes! Check out and chow down on Flaco’s sunshine sandwich they shared with us.

    Monthly Manifesto: Gainesville Citizens for Active Transport

    by Gainesville Citizens for Active Transport

    Gainesville Citizens for Active Transportation wants to make your life as a cyclist, foot pedestrian or other alternative-self-transporter easier. Join ’em!

    For The Record: Fall 2013

    by Andrew Baldizon and Emma Roulette

    The latest from our music column reviewing locally produced albums. This issue we tune in to Slugage, Dungeons and Dagrons and MSNRA.

    The Doctor Is In

    by Samantha Schuyler

    Our exclusive interview with philosopher and political activist Noam Chomsky, who visited Gainesville for the 20th anniversary of the Civic Media Center.

    Indivisible and Indispensable

    by Marissa Goldberg and Sara Nettle

    Gainesville’s treatment of minimum wage workers reflects a national trend: disrespect and missed checks.

  • Vol. V, Issue IV

    The Summer 2013 issue of The Fine Print is out and about town. Can’t get your hands on a copy? Flip through the PDF online here. (Crossword answers here!)

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    Monthly Manifesto: Forage Farm

    by Anna Prizzia

    A lush seed library and a vast farm invite Gainesville to dig around, get dirty and sprout something new.

    Balancing Nature’s Budget

    by Rain Araneda

    We Are Neutral helps UF offset carbon emissions, pushing the gator nation to carbon neutrality.

    The Unpaid, Unethical & No-Good Internship

    by Ashely Miller-Shaked

    Ah, summer is here and so is the unpaid internship. Great for experience and the resume, but this wageless labor is entirely unethical.

    Copy Cats Summer 2013

    by Fine Print Staff

    Stay in the know with articles, podcasts, gadgets, trends and more with Copy Cats. What we’re reading, using and listening to now.

    Paper Cuts Summer 2013

    by Fine Print Staff

    Paper cuts: A new study finds women on birth control are attracted to less masculine-looking men. Also, we’re all about gay rights, but what about the T in LGBT?

    Read Up, Drink Up

    by Raamish Karatela

    The Jones B-side shares their zingy rendition of a whiskey sour: “The Dixie Hotel.” Mix one up yourself and cheers to summer!

  • Vol. V, Issue III

    The Spring 2013 issue of The Fine Print is out and about town. Can’t get your hands on a copy? Flip through the PDF online here.

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    Copy Cats Spring 2013

    by Fine Print Staff

    Stay in the know with articles, podcasts, gadgets, trends and more with Copy Cats. What we’re reading, using and listening to now.

    Paper Cuts Spring 2013

    by Fine Print Staff

    Paper cuts: America is missing geniuses and our flawed higher education system is at fault. In other news, squid can fly (not kidding — read up here!).

    Read Up, Chow Down

    by Raamish Karatela

    Tempo Bistro To Go, a restaurant specializing in locally-sourced ingredients, shares their recipe for vegan Mafe-African Peanut Soup.

    For the Record: Spring 2013

    by Emma Roulette

    The latest from our music column reviewing locally produced albums. This issue our we tune in to Leela & The Rams, Euglossine, and Flat Land.

  • Vol. V, Issue II

    The Winter 2012 issue of The Fine Print is out and about town. Can’t get your hands on a copy? Flip through the PDF online here.

    Read the issue on Issuu

    Read Up, Chow Down: Civilization

    by Aleksandra Bacewicz

    Local recipe from Gainesville worker-owned restaurant Civilization on vegan (or not) Seminole Pumpkin Cheesecake.

    Copy Cats

    by Fine Print Staff

    Stay in the know with articles, podcasts, gadgets, trends and more with Copy Cats. What we’re reading, using and listening to now.

    Monthly Manifesto: Radiant Hands

    by Radiant Hands

    Radiant Hands, a non-profit charity in Gainesville, FL, provides financial and personal support tailored to the needs of families in crisis.

    Paper Cuts: Winter 2012

    by Fine Print Staff

    Paper Cuts: Chocolate correlated with Nobel Prize winners; Republican CEOs complain about Obamacare.

    Paying for Popularity

    by Lily Wan

    We don’t really have the money to pay for your attention, but we’d like to have it anyway. With Facebook’s new monetization efforts, small businesses are struggling to maintain views, clicks and popularity.

    A New American Dream

    by Samantha Schuyler

    The DREAM Act could grant citizenship to undocumented students at UF and around the country, if Obama fulfills his promise to make it a reality.

  • Vol. V, Issue I

    The Fall 2012 issue of The Fine Print is out and about town. Can’t get your hands on a copy? Flip through the PDF online here.

    Read the issue on Issuu

    For the Record: Fall 2012

    by Fine Print Staff

    Local music reviews of Thee Holy Ghosts, My Name Forever and Heart Burglars.

    Paper Cuts Fall 2012

    by Fine Print Staff

    Paper Cuts: Torture on the Homefront; A Beatles Painting Goes to Auction; CIW gains another victory

    Monthly Manifesto: National Women’s Liberation

    by Diana Moreno

    Gainesville Women’s Liberation, a local chapter of National Women’s Liberation, is a feminist group for women who want to organize against male supremacy, bring new fire to the fight for equality and win more freedom for women.

    Read Up, Chow Down: Becca Bakes

    by Lily Wan

    Local recipe this time from Becca Bakes of Gainesville of vegan (or not) Pumpkin Whoopie Pies with Cinnamon Cream Cheese filling.

  • Vol. IV, Issue III

    The Spring 2012 issue of The Fine Print is out and about town. Can’t get your hands on a copy? Here you go.

    Read the issue on Issuu

    Forget the Bull, Find the Matador

    by Cody Bond

    “What occupiers call peaceably assembling, police call trespassing, and the past four months have been peppered with late-night arrests.” A closer look at what’s become of Occupy Gainesville.

    Cinema Verde Returns

    by Kelsey Grentzer

    From Feb. 24 to March 2, activists, filmmakers, artists and students will showcase environmental issues and solutions from all over the world in Gainesville’s third annual Environmental Film and Arts Festival.

    To Sew, Make and Do

    by Caitlin Luedke

    Between open-studio nights and a multitude of classes, Sew Make Do is working to create a space in the community for crafters of all levels.

  • Vol. IV, Issue II

    The Winter 2011 issue of The Fine Print is out and about town. Can’t get your hands on a copy? Here you go.

    Read the issue on Issuu

    To Sew, Make and Do

    by Caitlin Luedke

    Between open-studio nights and a multitude of classes, Sew Make Do is working to create a space in the community for crafters of all levels.

    Soil Food

    by Diana Moreno

    Gainesville Compost began when UF graduate Chris Cano turned his passions, sustainability and gardening, into his own business. The goal was simple: to turn waste into food using local resources.

    Monthly Manifesto: Fight Back Florida

    by Richard Blake

    Fight Back Florida is a network of progressive students, labor activists, and workers throughout Florida that fight for accessible education and the rights of working families.

    Swallowtail Farm: Beyond Organic

    by Fine Print Staff

    A closer look at Swallowtail Farm, which pushes the boundaries of local food and organic agriculture. Photos by Ashley Crane.

    Pushing the Limit

    by Ellen McHugh

    After a wave of protests and public outrage, the city-imposed meal limit at St. Francis House is gone, only to be replaced by mandatory criminal background checks for the homeless and hungry.

    Uncharted Territory

    by Aleksandra Bacewicz

    Amidst the obstacles presented by poverty and deforestation, dedicated travelers are sowing the seeds of ecotourism in Haiti’s rugged terrain.

    Homemade for the Holidays

    by Adara Ney

    Supporting local businesses is a small way you can make a big impact on our local economy. So this holiday season, skip the generic gifts from corporate monstrosities and consider what’s made right here in Gainesville.

  • Vol. IV, Issue I

    The Fall 2011 issue of The Fine Print is out and about town. Can’t get your hands on a copy? Here you go.

    Read the issue on Issuu

    The Old Philanthropist

    by Jamie Fisher

    It made me sad to think that this was the image she would present to the world from now on, ten years past her death, and even twenty years later the philharmonic’s programs would show the same face.

    Adventure Outpost

    by Henry Taksier

    The following photos were taken at Adventure Outpost, where travelers can rent canoes, kayaks, and nature gear. One of its founders, a regional tour guide and conservation expert, leads tours along 60 different waterways in north and central Florida.

    Monthly Manifesto: IndieGainesville

    by Whitney Mutch

    IndieGainesville is a labor of love by locals (and for locals) to protect the interests of independent businesses in Gainesville.

    #Occupy: Beyond Left vs. Right

    by Henry Taksier

    Duane Schwingel, a neatly dressed father of two, identifies as a pro-life Christian conservative. He also writes defiant songs about the struggle to “tear down wall street” and restore democracy.

  • Vol. III, Issue V

    The Summer 2011 issue of The Fine Print is out and about town. Can’t get your hands on a copy? Here you go.

    Read the issue on Issuu

    Raise the Village

    by Ashira Morris

    Raise the Village is an iPhone app that allows players to develop a village by buying items like food, clean water and medicine. Here’s the twist: every item you purchase gets translated into a tangible product and delivered to Kapir Atiira, a real village in Uganda.

    5 Ways to Add Local Food to Your Diet

    by Alli Langley

    Ever tasted the difference between a ripe, juicy strawberry picked yesterday and an oversized strawberry sprayed with chemicals, picked last week and trucked across the country?

    The City Farmer: Yesterday’s News, Today’s Veggies

    by Krissy Abdullah

    My favorite recycled planter is made with old newspaper. Last year I made over 100 pots in a couple of days with a few newspapers I saved. Here’s how!

  • Vol. III, Issue IV

    The Spring 2011 issue of The Fine Print is out and about town. Can’t get your hands on a copy? Here you go.

    Read the issue on Issuu

    A Closer Look at TOMS

    by Ellen McHugh

    For every pair of TOMS shoes bought, the company will send another pair to kids in need all over the world. But what about the workers in Argentina, China and Ethiopia who make them?

    Sage and Thyme

    by Ellen McHugh

    They call him the “herb man.” James Steele was Gainesville’s first local provider of herbs and the man behind Gainesville Farm Fresh. But really, who is this elusive man and how did he become who he is today?

    CIW: El Pueblo Unido (The People United)

    by Fine Print Staff

    On March 5, over 1500 farmworkers and their allies marched through the streets of Tampa during a rally organized by the Coalition of Immokalee Workers.

  • Vol. III, Issue III

    The February 2011 issue of The Fine Print is out and about town. Can’t get your hands on a copy? Here you go.

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    Homeless Without Healthcare

    by Juliana Jimenez

    The chemotherapy left small burns on her legs, hands and the tip of her nose. If she could, she would do this twice a day, like the doctors recommend. But each treatment costs $80, money she can’t afford.

    Taking Back the Fourth Estate

    by Fine Print Staff

    We here at The Fine Print have just received the latest batch of unedited cables leaked by the rogue site known only as WikiLeaks. This information is yet to be condemned by the current administration, but much of it concerns a certain government-sponsored facility in Iran.

    Bags & Barrels: Rebuilding Haiti

    by Rain Araneda

    A year after Haiti’s devastating earthquake, one local nonprofit is mobilizing volunteers and training workers in Haiti to quickly build cheap, sustainable houses out of “earthbags” and to capture clean water using rain barrels.

    Paying for the Privilege

    by Cristina Rabaza

    Under UF’s new block tuition policy, students with full-time jobs and other extracurricular obligations may find themselves paying extra for classes they don’t have time to take.

    The Realities of War

    by Ellen McHugh

    Reagan-era Veteran Paul Ortiz is gathering a collection of stories from Florida’s veterans, ranging from WWII to the present. His purpose is to shed light on the reality of war.

    Greener Pastures: A Farm Sanctuary

    by Fine Print Staff

    A closer look at Greener Pastures, a local sanctuary in which a few lucky farm animals receive compassion and regular veterinary care.

    The Icarus Project

    by Rusty Poulette

    A radical mental health support group in Gainesville provides a haven for those who struggle with psychiatric conditions — such as depression and anxiety — without framing them as “illnesses.”

    Open Access

    by Jeremiah Tattersall

    The concept of Open Access is simple but revolutionary: Anyone with Internet access can immediately read any article published. With the majority of research done at the University of Florida being paid for by tax dollars, why should the tax payers have to pay again in subscription fees for access to their results?

  • Vol. III, Issue II

    What happens when you don't print for two months? Your layout director becomes paranoid that her job is obsolete and figures out how to make the print edition available online.

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    Understanding UF’s Tobacco-Free Policy

    by Irving Romero De La Rosa

    Not many students, faculty or staff who violate UF’s tobacco-free policy would want their names printed in a magazine, but the fact that it happens is not hard to miss — just take a walk through campus. With no tangible means of enforcement, there are still smokers who break the rules to get their fix. Many of them complain about the policy, lacking knowledge of how or why it was passed.

    B.S. Science: Water Fluoridation

    by Jeremiah Tattersall

    Water fluoridation has been called a communist plot to undermine our health and described as a scheme by the nuclear industry to dispose of its waste. Nonetheless, the majority of scientific evidence maintains that it is a safe, effective way to prevent cavities for the most vulnerable among us.

    Rationalizing the Ration Ratio

    by Cristina Rabaza

    It took three war-related health conditions and zero job opportunities to land Steve Dennis in debt. And it takes 130 people arriving before him at the St. Francis House for him to be turned away.

    The Land of ‘You Can’t Touch This’

    by Thomas Baker

    How is UF’s appetite for funding from the Department of Defense affecting the direction of its research?

    Who Needs ‘Em?

    by Diana Moreno

    Coping with your failed political party relationship.

    Nov. 2010 Crossword Answer Key

    by Adam Brown

    Digging the Rubble: Newnansville

    by Cody Bond

    No kicks left in Newnansville, and not a soul to talk to. Just the cicadas holding vigil as the sun sets through the live oaks. People call this place a ghost town, but there is no town left to haunt, and the ghosts have long since faded like the letters etched in their tombstones.

    Punk Rock Mecca

    by Fine Print Staff

    Ye Old FEST 9 has come to pass. For one weekend, Gainesville was the punk rock capital of the Dirty South. If you missed it or are having withdrawals, here are some wicked pictures documenting the mayhem.

  • Vol. VII

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    Institutional Lies

    by Nathalie Chybik

    A local task force advocates for public schools to more thoroughly teach African American history.

    Heart to Heart

    by Caroline Nickerson

    A local group is regularly visiting detained undocumented immigrants at the Baker County Jail in hopes of providing emotional support.

    #BlackLivesMatter

    by Kyle Hayes

    Local activists bring Gainesville into the national Black Lives Matter movement, protesting against police violence suffered by people of color.

    I Saw Something, I’m Saying Something: Might Ain’t Right

    by Jordan MacKenzie

    Rape is not a series of unconnected events. It’s part of a larger structure of violence.

    For the Record: Fall 2014

    by Fine Print Staff

    Here’s the scoop on some locally grown tunes. This issue, we talk to Wax Wings, Dikembe and Victor Florence.

  • Vol. VI

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    Frankly Speaking: Generation JK

    by Tyler Francischine

    Tyler talks about ironic communication and the influence it has on our lives.

    Frankly Speaking: The Spaces In Between

    by Tyler Francischine

    Tyler talks about how when we feel we’re missing out we fail to look in.

    Frankly Speaking: Judge Not

    by Tyler Francischine

    Tyler takes a deeper look at surface level judgement.

    Out of Sight, On the Mine

    by Lily Wan

    Is mountaintop removal mining America’s best kept secret? It might be Gainesville’s. Find out the truth behind the coal our city refuses to turn down.

    Frankly Speaking: Table for One

    by Tyler Francischine

    “Alone” and “lonely” are not synonymous. Tyler shares her musings on solitude and making that reservation for one.

  • Vol. V

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    C U IRL

    by Tyler Francischine

    Are we too obsessed with preserving and thriving off our online identities? Tyler Francischine returns with her column “Frankly Speaking” and share her thoughts on the new norm of virtual and “IRL” personalities.

    I’m Ig-Knowing You

    by Tyler Francischine

    New column, Frankly Speaking, explores the Gainesville scene, our odd social cues and living in a transient town.

  • Vol. IX

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    Right In

    by Pia Molina

    Chloë Goldbach is Gainesville’s first trans woman to run for office.

    The New Standard

    by Anne Marie Tamburro

    Development in Gainesville will continue to target the university’s main demographic, college students and young professionals, at the expense of other communities in town.

    Manifest Destiny

    by Natalie Rao

    How Gainesville’s biggest punk-gathering came to be.

    A Thorn In Our Side

    by Romy Ellenbogen

    Bread and Roses is one of few abortions clinics left in North Florida.

    Simply Science: Gone Viral

    by Vincent McDonald

    What’s the deal with Zika?

    For the Record: Fall 2016

    by The Fine Print staff

    Here’s the scoop on some locally grown tunes. This issue, we talk to EW; Jordan Burchel and Kane Pour.

    Opinion: Una Herida Abierta

    by Kevin Artiga

    The harmful discourse surrounding immigration.

  • Vol. IV

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    Don’t Haze Me, Bro

    by Ted Eliott

    Tradition’s tough to break. Can laws and policies ever successfully bring hazing to a halt?

    The Future Doesn’t Look So Bright

    by Ellen McHugh and Lydia Fiser

    State budget cuts, rising tuition costs and lessening support from Bright Futures dim the light at the end of the tunnel.

    Fast for Fair Food: Update

    by Rain Araneda and Henry Taksier

    Despite recent efforts from the Coalition of Immokalee Workers, Publix refuses to address human rights violations within its supply chain.

    Monthly Manifesto: Student Animal Alliance

    by Matt Binder

    Through education, volunteering, and community support, the SAA seeks to fight institutionalized animal cruelty and promote the viability of compassionate lifestyles.

    City Farmer: Wild Edibles in Not-So-Wild Places

    by Krissy Abdullah

    Think foraging is a thing of the past? Think again.

    See SAW Draw

    by Travis Epes

    The Sequential Artist Workshop, a school for those who refuse to write off comics as childhood fantasy, opens up in Gainesville.

    The Biomass Effect

    by Christine Csencsitz

    Your wallet’s perspective on the city’s upcoming biomass facility.

    The Cost of Medicaid Cuts

    by Aleksandra Bacewicz

    A closer look at how promised Medicaid cuts will affect Shands Healthcare Center and its most vulnerable patients, such as Daniel Markey (see photo) whose cystic fibrosis medications amount to at least $15,000 a month.

    Reactors in the Distance

    by Lily Wan

    Is nuclear energy necessary in Florida? Environmental organizations and industry critics question Progress Energy’s plans to revive Crystal River’s aging nuclear facility (and to build an entirely new one in Levy County).

    The Church of Holy Colors

    by Rain Araneda

    If you haven’t experienced Gainesville’s vibrant underground art and music scene, here’s a great place to start.

  • Issue V

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    Summer 2011: From the Editors

    by Chelsea Hetelson

    In this issue, you may notice there are, not one, but two original covers. To double your pleasure and double your summer fun, we doubled the cover and doubled the content; it’s a double issue!

    Monthly Manifesto: VOX

    by Rosemary Daniels

    Vox: Voices for Planned Parenthood is a group on the UF campus that promotes safe sex, sex education, healthy relationships, and reproductive rights. That’s what the pamphlet says and that’s what you’ve heard before. Here’s what it means in action.

    The Biomass Controversy

    by Lily Wan

    Although it’s officially called the Gainesville Renewable Energy Center (GREC), protesters are calling the county’s planned biomass facility an “incinerator in disguise.”

  • Issue IV

    Read the issue on Issuu

    Institutional Lies

    by Nathalie Chybik

    A local task force advocates for public schools to more thoroughly teach African American history.

    Heart to Heart

    by Caroline Nickerson

    A local group is regularly visiting detained undocumented immigrants at the Baker County Jail in hopes of providing emotional support.

    Frankly Speaking: Generation JK

    by Tyler Francischine

    Tyler talks about ironic communication and the influence it has on our lives.

    Don’t Haze Me, Bro

    by Ted Eliott

    Tradition’s tough to break. Can laws and policies ever successfully bring hazing to a halt?

    The Future Doesn’t Look So Bright

    by Ellen McHugh and Lydia Fiser

    State budget cuts, rising tuition costs and lessening support from Bright Futures dim the light at the end of the tunnel.

    Fast for Fair Food: Update

    by Rain Araneda and Henry Taksier

    Despite recent efforts from the Coalition of Immokalee Workers, Publix refuses to address human rights violations within its supply chain.

    Monthly Manifesto: Student Animal Alliance

    by Matt Binder

    Through education, volunteering, and community support, the SAA seeks to fight institutionalized animal cruelty and promote the viability of compassionate lifestyles.

    City Farmer: Wild Edibles in Not-So-Wild Places

    by Krissy Abdullah

    Think foraging is a thing of the past? Think again.

    See SAW Draw

    by Travis Epes

    The Sequential Artist Workshop, a school for those who refuse to write off comics as childhood fantasy, opens up in Gainesville.

    The Biomass Effect

    by Christine Csencsitz

    Your wallet’s perspective on the city’s upcoming biomass facility.

  • Issue III

    Read the issue on Issuu

    Trial and Error

    by Anne Marie Tamburro

    In light of recent events, immigration has become a hot topic. But it’s not so simple. We break down the confusing process for you.

    Smoke and Mirrors

    by Kevin Artiga and Ali Sundook

    Amendment 2 passed last November, but soon-to-be-implemented regulations might make medical marijuana less accessible to people without specific medical conditions.

    Monthly Manifesto: Interfaith Alliance for Immigrant Justice

    by Richard McMaster, Coordinator

    The Interfaith Alliance for Immigrant Justice is working to make Gainesville a sanctuary city.

    Power Outrages

    by Allie McDaniel

    Why is your utility bill one of the highest in the state?

    Partners in Grime

    by Vincent McDonald

    UF’s food service provider has a shady past with state prisons.

    Homestead Instead: Seeing Red

    by Brittany Evans

    Why buy it when you can make it? Learn how to make your carbon footprint a little less red and a little more green.

    Read Up, Chow Down: Tamal

    by Amanda Rosa

    At exactly noon, Nick Iannelli, co-owner of Tamal, wheels out a large horse-drawn cart onto the sidewalk. A chalkboard sign hanging over the cart reads: “For You: Delicious Tamales.” Rachel Iannelli, Nick’s wife, has been rolling and steaming them all morning. Small pieces of Southwestern art and Mexican textiles are scattered around and above the …

    Paper Cuts: Spring 2017

    by The Editors

    Not-necessarily-Gainesville-based news: Gay men are disappearing in Chechnya and researchers discovered how to hack your phone using sound waves.

    Gunning For It

    by Molly Minta

    Marginalized communities look to to arm themselves in greater numbers.

    A Divorce From the Streets

    by Ashley Lombardo

    One woman’s story surviving human trafficking in Gainesville.

  • Issue II

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    Minority Report

    by Lucy March

    The numbers show that UF is diverse, but what is it doing to create an inclusive campus?

    Frankly Speaking: Judge Not

    by Tyler Francischine

    Tyler takes a deeper look at surface level judgement.

    Out of Sight, On the Mine

    by Lily Wan

    Is mountaintop removal mining America’s best kept secret? It might be Gainesville’s. Find out the truth behind the coal our city refuses to turn down.

    I’m Ig-Knowing You

    by Tyler Francischine

    New column, Frankly Speaking, explores the Gainesville scene, our odd social cues and living in a transient town.

    No ID, No Vote

    by Melanie Brkich

    Republican-sponsored voter ID laws, allegedly designed to prevent voter fraud, run the risk of marginalizing women, minorities, youth, and low-income voters. Is the GOP’s anti-fraud crusade tainted by ulterior motives?

    UF Says “Yes” to Rape Awareness

    by Chelsea Hetelson

    UF is working to rebuild its lost reputation as a national leader in rape awareness and prevention tactics.

    Nov. 2010: From the Editors

    by Henry Taksier

    What the hell is The Fine Print, anyway?

    Undocumented: ‘Illegal’ Student Shares Her Story

    by Victoria Winkler

    Mica, who asked that only her first name be used, shares her experience as an undocumented student from Argentina. Learn about the DREAM Act through a voice that represents the 65,000 undocumented students in America who depend on it.

    Where the Red Fern Grows

    by James Chapin

    On a Thursday afternoon, about a dozen people will take a private tour of Prairie Creek Conservation Cemetery and sign a final wish document, sealing their commitment to an eco-friendly afterlife.

  • Issue I

    Read the issue on Issuu

    Right In

    by Pia Molina

    Chloë Goldbach is Gainesville’s first trans woman to run for office.

    The New Standard

    by Anne Marie Tamburro

    Development in Gainesville will continue to target the university’s main demographic, college students and young professionals, at the expense of other communities in town.

    Manifest Destiny

    by Natalie Rao

    How Gainesville’s biggest punk-gathering came to be.

    A Thorn In Our Side

    by Romy Ellenbogen

    Bread and Roses is one of few abortions clinics left in North Florida.

    Simply Science: Gone Viral

    by Vincent McDonald

    What’s the deal with Zika?

    For the Record: Fall 2016

    by The Fine Print staff

    Here’s the scoop on some locally grown tunes. This issue, we talk to EW; Jordan Burchel and Kane Pour.

    Opinion: Una Herida Abierta

    by Kevin Artiga

    The harmful discourse surrounding immigration.

    I Saw Something, I’m Saying Something: Might Ain’t Right

    by Jordan MacKenzie

    Rape is not a series of unconnected events. It’s part of a larger structure of violence.

    For the Record: Fall 2014

    by Fine Print Staff

    Here’s the scoop on some locally grown tunes. This issue, we talk to Wax Wings, Dikembe and Victor Florence.

    Frankly Speaking: Table for One

    by Tyler Francischine

    “Alone” and “lonely” are not synonymous. Tyler shares her musings on solitude and making that reservation for one.